Qualification -Advanced Diploma Horticulture - Ornamental Horticulture

Course CodeVHT009
Fee CodeAD
Duration (approx)2500 hours
QualificationAdvanced Diploma

Train to be a professional horticulturist

This level of study is a substantial commitment; close to three years of full time study for most people (post secondary education).
 
Our graduates from this level of training have, in the past; either established their own horticultural businesses or found employment as a professional (eg. manager, technician, teacher, consultant). 
  • In completion graduates may upgrade from this qualification either to a degree, or undertake further specialist studies at a post graduate level.
  • This course is a significant commitment in time. We also offer the possibility to undertake a shorter Foundation or associate diploma; and then upgrade to this or any other advanced diploma later on; obtaining full credits for any modules completed in your first qualification.
 

    Modules

    Core ModulesThese modules provide foundation knowledge for the Qualification -Advanced Diploma Horticulture - Ornamental Horticulture.
     Biochemistry I -Plants BSC102
     Botany I BSC104
     Horticultural Research A BHT118
     Horticulture I BHT101
     Machinery and Equipment BSC105
     Plant Identification and Knowledge (Horticulture II) BHT102
     Soil Management - Horticulture BHT105
     Amenity Horticulture I BHT234
     Horticultural Management BHT203
     Horticultural Research B BHT241
     Plant Protection BHT207
     Horticultural Marketing BHT304
     
    Elective ModulesIn addition to the core modules, students study any 13 of the following 24 modules.
     Arboriculture I BHT106
     Cottage Garden Design BHT110
     Herb Culture BHT114
     Landscape Construction BHT111
     Nature Park Management I BEN120
     Turf Care BHT104
     Amenity Horticulture II BHT235
     Arboriculture II BHT208
     Botany II BSC204
     Cut Flower Production BHT221
     Cutting Propagation BHT211
     Garden Centre Management BHT213
     Irrigation - Gardens BHT210
     Permaculture Systems BHT201
     Planning Layout and Construction of Ornamental Gardens BHT242
     Playground Design BHT216
     Project Management BBS201
     Roses BHT231
     Sports Turf Management BHT202
     Trees For Rehabilitation (Reafforestation) BHT205
     Tropical Plants BHT234
     Organic Plant Culture BHT302
     Turf Repair And Renovation BHT303
     Water Gardening BHT307
     

    Note that each module in the Qualification -Advanced Diploma Horticulture - Ornamental Horticulture is a short course in its own right, and may be studied separately.


    Scope of the Work

    Ornamental horticulture covers such a wide range of things, only limited by your imagination. Ornamental plants are found everywhere in our daily lives, from the plants in our parks and home gardens, to the lawns and street trees along our roads. We use ornamentals to decorate our homes, offices and shopping malls as indoor plants, and give flowers cut from ornamentals to express our love for another.

    Someone needs to plan for, plant and maintain ornamental plants in all such situations.

    The work of an ornamental horticulturist may involve working hands on in gardens (eg. pruning, watering, feeding, controlling pests, mowing lawns); or it may involve supervising or managing others either creating maintaining ornamental plants. With the skills and knowledge you develop in this diploma, you will have a capacity to start and grow a career in any area of ornamental horticulture, maybe operating your own business, or maybe working for someone else.

    There's a lot to learn

    This is not a light weight course. There are diplomas with some colleges that can be completed faster, but your ability to compete in this industry is directly affected by how much you learn. Getting a better start will give you the capacity to shine beyond others, and deal with challenges that others with a lesser education stumble with.

     

    Consider just one aspect of the job: pruning. Pruning requirements and timing for the different plants will however vary according to many different factors and there are sometimes no fixed rules about what pruning is best for which plant at what time.  Pruning may be required in spring, summer, autumn or winter or in several different seasons to varying degrees.  All this depends on the:

    •     Location where the plants are grown (for example northern or southern hemisphere).
    •     Climate (for example, tropical versus temperate).
    •     Aspect (for example north versus south facing slopes).
    •     Microclimate (for example sunny courtyard or deep shade).
    •     Reason for pruning (for example, ornamental appearance versus fruit or flower production, or disease reduction).

    There are generally eight different protocols (i.e. official procedures or system of rules) for pruning a plant, depending on the species and type of plant, and these are summarised as follows: 

    • Plants that require no pruning except for hygiene (e.g. the removal of dead or diseased or damaged plant tissue).  This does assume that you have planted the plant with enough room to grow to its full potential unencumbered by other plants or buildings etc., for example in a lawn. It could apply to large trees such as conifers and other ornamental trees examples include deciduous trees such as elms, oaks, birches etc., conifers such as Cedrus deodara, C. atlantica, Picea spp. etc. other evergreens such as Eucalyptus spp.  etc.
    • Plants that respond best to no pruning except for deadheading and to restrict the growth to a moderate size. The plant species that fall into this rule will often resent being cut hard back, because there are no dormant buds on their stems. Ceonothus spp. Cytisus spp., and Cistus spp. are all good examples.
    • Plants that need no pruning unless they are growing too big for the allocated space - in which case they should have the ability to be cut hard back, even to the ground if needed though for grafted varieties this may cause it to revert to the root stock.  In the wild these are the plants that resprout after fire or frost. Examples include: Buddleia spp. Caryopteris spp Cornus alba (red twig dogwood, Forsythia spp., Hydrangea spp. Ligustrum spp. (Privet), Berberis spp., Philadelphus spp. (mock orange), Kolwitzia amabilis (beauty bush), Weigela spp., Sambucus spp. (elderberry) etc.  
    • Those plants that flower before early summer and in a temperate climate tend to flower on branches that were produced in the previous growing season. Cut these back as soon as possible after flowers fade (late pruning will cut of next season’s flowers).
    • Those plants that flower after early summer in a temperate climate tend to flower on branches produced in the current growing season. Cut these plants back late winter in temperate regions and early spring in cool regions.
    • Plants that flower on short spurs on a mature skeleton or framework of branches (for example fruit trees) – use the pruning guide for fruit trees.
    • Plants that you prune by stooling (coppicing or pollarding) to promote colourful stems or a particular type of foliage or to turn a tree into a shrub – use the pruning guide for coppicing or pollarding.
    • Flowering on biennial or older stems and shoots for example apples, pears sour cherries etc., use the pruning guide for apples and pears.

    There are thousands of different plants to learn about, and every one is pruned differently, just as every one has a different requirement for watering, light and shade, soil conditions and pest protection. If you choose a course like this one that teaches you about more than a thousand different plants, you will have a foundation for dealing with almost anything.

    There are however, no short cuts to really valuable learning about ornamental horticulture.

    Plenty of Opportunities

    Horticulture is a huge industry, and demand for highly qualified professionals is high; particularly those who have combined skills and knowledge that cover both horticulture and management; and have also developed a high level of plant knowledge.
     
    Unfortunately, many courses often don't balance these three courses as well as they might. Graduates who can grow plants well, may not realize their full potential because they lack management skills and a good sense of productivity. Others may develop a high level of scientific knowledge, understanding the botany and chemistry that underpins horticulture; but lacking the ability to identify and differentiate between the different needs of different plants.
     
    Ours is a practical school, developed and run by people who have worked in horticulture  as managers and technicians for decades.
    This course is designed for today's world and the world of the future; with the aim of setting you up for a lifelong career.

    You will interact with the real industry as part of your studies, developing networking skills and an awareness of opportunities that exist and are developing. Learn, experience and network as you study and you will emerge from your studies with not only a capacity to succeed, but also the right sort of attitude that is needed for success.

     
     

    WHAT WILL THIS COURSE DO FOR YOU?

    Our graduates from this level of training have, in the past; either established their own horticultural businesses or found employment as a professional (eg. manager, technician, teacher, consultant). 
    • In completion graduates may upgrade from this qualification either to a degree, or undertake further specialist studies at a post graduate level.
    • This course is a significant commitment in time. We also offer the possibility to undertake a shorter Foundation or associate diploma; and then upgrade to this or any other advanced diploma later on; obtaining full credits for any modules completed in your first qualification.

     

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