Arboriculture II

Course CodeBHT208
Fee CodeS2
Duration (approx)100 hours
QualificationStatement of Attainment

HOME STUDY - ARBORICULTURE MANAGEMENT - DISTANCE LEARNING

Learn preventative arboriculture and plantation establishment

  • Improve your management of trees to minimize potential long term tree problems.
  • Learn about better tree selection, strengthening and improving health of existing trees.
  • Gain techniques used to safely remove trees and stumps
  • Learn establishment of tree plantations
  • Get the confidence to extend your business or work
  • Save money by home study

7 Lessons with set task, 7 assignments. Online and elearning comes with self assessment tasks.

This course is designed to follow on from Arboriculture I, however it may be taken as a stand alone short course.

“This course provides graduates with more in-depth knowledge than Arboriculture I by focussing on such topics as transplanting techniques, environmental control, environmental tolerance, and strengthening techniques, as well as felling and stump removal. The course culminates with a lesson on establishing and designing a tree plantation geared at the serious professional.” - Gavin Cole B.Sc., Psych.Cert., Cert.Garden Design, MACA, ACS Tutor.

Lesson Structure

There are 7 lessons in this course:

  1. Planting Techniques
    • Soil, Water, Climate, Maintenance, Matching a tree to the site, Local regulations, Plant at the right time, Planting techniques, Plant size and age, Container type, Buying a tree, How to plant a tree, Watering method, Transplanting a large tree, Preparing for transplanting, Aftercare, small feature trees, Transplanting deciduous trees, Pruning at planting, Pocket planting, Slope serratioin, Wattling, Planting on Arid sites, Direct seeding, Spray seeding, trees with berries,
  2. Controlling Plant Problems
    • Temperature, Frost, Winds, Acclimatisation, Tree guards, Other Tree Problems (Fire damage, Fire Resistant trees, pollution and toxic reactions, Soil contamination, Treating foliage burn, Soil rehabilitation, Trees to extract soil contaminants, Soil chemical composition, Air pollution and tree growth, pollutant tolerant trees, Pollution intolerant trees, Trees to control Urban air pollution, Dry soils, Symptoms of drought stressed trees, Dry soil tolerant trees, Trees for hot sites, Drainage problems and trees, Wet tolerant trees, Treee health problems, Resistant plant species, Choosing and using pesticides safely, Biological controls of pest and disease, Lifescycles, Tree termites, Tree injections, Tree nutrition and nutrition management, Fertilisers
  3. Strengthening Weak Trees
    • Trimming, Trimming technique, Adverse responses to trimming, thinning, Bracing, temporary props, Modern bracing systems, Bolting, Rodding technique, Guy wires, How strong is dead wood, Cabling
  4. Controlling Damage Caused by Plants
    • Tree damage, Tree root problems, trees that can cause problems with drains, Orecautions with drains, Selecting and using trees near drains, Limiting root problems, Root pruning, Trees and the water table (Aquafiers), Trees and power lines, Poisonous trees,
  5. Tree Felling and Stump Removal
    • Tree evaluation systems, Calculating tree value, Tree removal, Why remove a tree, Tree felling methods, Axe, Saws, Winches, Chain saw, Controlling the fall, Different methods or removing stumps, Protecting trees, National Tree registers, Measuring tree height, Keeping a work site safe, risk assessment, Duty of care, Costing jobs,
  6. Tolerant Plant Species
    • What to plant where, Tree data required, Influence of trees on buildings, Species suitability, Planning considerations, Harsh environments, frost protection, Frost resistant trees, Sun protection, Mulching, Fencing, wind protection, Wind tolerant trees, Soil degradation, Saline tolerant trees, Lime tolerance, Acid tolerance, Hardy trees for inner city, Review of several major genera (Aer, Fraxinus, Pinus, Quercus,
  7. Establishing a Tree Plantation
    • Windbreaks, Windbreak design, Choosing windbreak species, Designing tree plantations, Producing drawings to scale.

Each lesson culminates in an assignment which is submitted to the school, marked by the school's tutors and returned to you with any relevant suggestions, comments, and if necessary, extra reading.

Aims

  • Calculate the cost of removing a specified tree.
    • Explain how to plant a specified advanced-sized tree on a specific site.
  • Explain tree injection, including the technique and applications.
  • Identify situations where trees require strengthening operations to be carried out.
  • Compare different ways to control roots which invade underground pipes.
  • Determine appropriate tree species suited to a specific site you visit and analyse.
  • Devise a method for removing a tree, including tree felling and stump removal.
  • Analyse specimens of mature trees, from each of five different genera, to detect any patterns in problems occurring in those trees.
  • Develop criteria for the establishment of a tree plantation on a specific site which addresses; site restrictions, cost and function.

Why Grow Trees

 

THE IMPORTANCE OF TREES ON SOILS

 

The importance of trees to land management cannot be overstated. Often in the past they have been seen as competing for valuable land space and felled indiscriminately. Over clearing of trees can lead to salinity problems and numerous forms of erosion and land slips. As we have become more familiar with their vital role in ecological processes, retention and selective planting of trees has been widely acknowledged, in improving farm viability and ultimately production.

 

Trees help control or reduce erosion and can help to improve the structure and texture of soil – trees with large root systems create soil pores which aid water penetration and improve soil oxygen levels. Roots can also bind soil particles together improving structure.

 

The roots of some trees however can have a detrimental affect on the soil by removing nutrients and creating a fibrous barrier against water penetration. The organic matter produced by some trees (eg. pines) can also acidify the soil and deter the growth of other plants nearby.

 

Trees act as windbreaks, decreasing the winds ability to dislodge and move soil particles and also reduce the erosive potential of rainfall by providing a protective cover over the soil below, intercepting rainfall, which then either:

a) Evaporate back into the atmosphere without ever reaching the ground,

b) Drip slowly from the tree foliage reducing the potential for surface runoff (longer time for available water to infiltrate into the soil), hence reducing the likelihood of surface erosion.

c) Flow down the branches, and trunk of the trees eventually reaching the ground, but with far less erosive power (energy) than if it dripped or fell directly onto the ground surface

d) Act as a physical barrier trapping moving soil/sand particles.

 

Trees also:

1. Lower water tables - this helps lower water tables reducing water logging of surface soils and salinity problems.

 

2. Produce organic matter - this encourages soil microbial activity and earthworms to improve soil texture and structure.
Knowledge is Critical to Business or Career Success
 
A Tree Surgeon or Arborist is continually doing things to promote or discourage tree growth; to manage and affect the type of trees in a landscape and to reduce risks that trees might pose to everything from the built landscape to the people who move about near the trees.
 
Sometimes they need to curtail the growth of tree roots and branches that may cause damage to both public and private property. At other times they need to undertake measures to deter the deterioration of a tree. 
 
Certain species can cause a significant amount of property damage in an urban environment by lifting footpaths and house foundations as well as overshadowing neighbouring property. Some species are more susceptible to certain health problems.
 

Therefore it is necessary to understand:

  • Which species to grow where, and which to avoid
  • How to treat at risk trees for prevention of further damage
  • How to implement a safe tree after-treatment program
  • The legal implications regarding damage caused by trees.
These may seem simple things to learn; but when you consider that there are tens of thousands of different tree species, and they all grow differently in different situations, the knowledge required by a good arborist is immense.
A course like this (or any other) could never hope to teach you everything you would ever need to know; but it can, and doues give you the ability to know where to find information that is reliable, and how to properly interpret what you find.

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