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Landscaping III (Landscaping Styles)

Course CodeBHT235
Fee CodeS2
Duration (approx)100 hours
QualificationStatement of Attainment


Learn how to Design Different Types of Gardens

  • For landscape and Garden Design Professionals, or passionate garden enthusiasts
  • Expand your Career opportunities
  • Extend the services offered by your landscape business
  • Understand how different styles of garden can be properly created

Throughout garden history, people have created different types of gardens in different places, with different purposes in mind.

Gardens have in some places, at some times, been influenced more by fashion, religion or social conditions than by practicalities. At other times, garden style has been primarily influenced by practical concerns.

While many people today may choose to create gardens to reflect their own preferences, whether aesthetic or practical; sometimes new gardens are created to mimic (at least partially), a previous style -whether from a particular region of the world, or perhaps a particular time in history.

We can also gain inspiration from styles of the past. By looking at what people did in another time and place, we sometimes discover ideas that can be incorporated into a new garden.

There are really no rules which you MUST always follow; though to create a particular style, the characteristics of a garden should be dominated by that one style.

Example:

  • An oriental garden is a garden dominated by those features which characterise an oriental garden
  • A modern garden is dominated by modern features
  • A cottage garden in dominated by features which would have been found in a cottage garden of old England and similar places.
  • When styles are mixed so that no one style dominates, the resulting style might be called “Eclectic”.

Lesson Structure

There are 10 lessons in this course:

  1. Creating the Mood
    • Active vs Passive
    • Simple vs. complex
    • Movement vs. Static
    • Light vs. Shade
    • Managing Light and Shade
    • Increasing or Reducing Light
    • Plants that Thrive in Shade
    • Garden Lighting
    • Other Factors that Affect Mood
    • What Do You Want in a Garden
    • Personality in the Garden
    • Keeping it in Scale
    • Colour and the Garden
    • Using Coloured Statuary
    • Other Coloured Surfaces
    • Psychological Effects of Colours
    • Water in the Garden
    • Hot Plants
    • Making a Garden Appear Cooler
    • Site Analysis
    • Macro Design
    • Designing a Garden Room
  2. Historic Gardens
    • Introduction
    • Roman Gardens
    • Chinese Gardens
    • Landscape Designers
    • Historic Considerations
    • Other Types of Gardens; formal, informal, natural, resort, permaculture, herb, rose, cottage
    • Cottage Garden Design
    • Cottage Garden Features
    • Plants in a Cottage Garden
    • Federation Gardens
    • Edwardian Gardens
  3. Formal Gardens
    • Introduction
    • Design Elements of Formal Gardens
    • Types of Formal Garden; Avenue, hedged beds, etc
    • Planting in Formal Gardens
    • Traditional Ornamentation; Sundials, Weather vanes, Bird Baths
    • Traditional Furniture; seats, pots, arbors, arches, gazebos
    • Formal Courtyards
  4. Oriental Gardens
    • Introduction
    • Chinese Gardens
    • Japanese Gardens
    • Types of Japanese Gardens: Hill and Pond, Dry Landscape, Tea Garden, Stroll Garden, Courtyard, Classic Rock Garden
    • Japanese Garden Features; Tori, Shishi-odishi, Moss Garden, Bamboo Fence, Bridges
    • Bonsai
    • Ornamental Grasses
  5. Middle Eastern and Spanish Style
    • Introduction
    • Features of Moorish Gardens
    • Sense of Enclosure
    • Mexican Style
    • Mexican Planting Schemes
    • Use of Coloured Gravel
  6. Mediterranean Gardens
    • Introduction
    • Features of Mediterranean Gardens
    • Regional Differences
    • Colours
    • Built Landscape
    • Plant Material
    • Use of Paint
    • Veranda Gardens
    • Making the Most of Small Spaces
    • Microclimates
  7. Coastal Gardens
    • Coastal Garden Features
    • Temperature, Humidity and Wind
    • Windbreaks
    • Salt and Soil Conditions
    • Coastal Plants
  8. Modern Gardens
    • Introduction
    • Technology in the garden; screens, lights, water features, music
    • Maintenance
    • Architecture; shapes and angles, colour, sculpture
    • Courtyards
    • Inner City Gardens
    • Types of Inner City Gardens
    • Future Trends
  9. Eclectic Gardens
    • Creating an Eclectic Garden
    • Using Garden Ornaments in an Eclectic Garden
    • Plants
    • Living Art
    • Topiary
    • Hedges
    • Pleaching
    • Miniature Gardens
    • Trough Gardens
    • Pebble Gardens
    • Art Gardens
    • Public Gardens
  10. Other Styles
    • Dryland Gardens
    • The Desert Landscape
    • Xeriscapes
    • Australian Bush Garden
    • Cacti and Succulent Gardens
    • Minimalist Landscapes
    • Permaculture
    • Rainforest Gardens
    • Tropical Style Gardens
    • Bird Attracting Gardens
    • Bulb Gardens

Each lesson culminates in an assignment which is submitted to the school, marked by the school's tutors and returned to you with any relevant suggestions, comments, and if necessary, extra reading.

Aims

  • Explain the use of colour, light, shade, temperature, water, foliage and other elements in establishing the mood of a garden.
  • Describe gardens from different places and periods in history; and in doing so explain how to renovate and/or recreate gardens that reflect the style of different historic periods.
  • Apply the principles, design features and elements that make up a formal garden.
  • Discuss cultural and historical traditions that contributed to the development and style of the oriental garden.
  • Discuss cultural and historical traditions that have contributed to the development and style of the Middle Eastern and Spanish garden.
  • Discuss the historic, climatic and cultural influences which have contributed to the style of Mediterranean gardens.
  • Discuss design styles of coastal gardens
  • Explain the limitations and potential of coastal sites when preparing a landscape design.
  • Discuss contemporary garden design styles and possible future trends in garden design.
  • Identify the range of diversity possible in garden design.
  • Identify characteristics of different garden styles including eclectic, dryland, permaculture, rainforest and tropical garden styles.
  • Design different styles of gardens.

WHAT YOU WILL DO IN THIS COURSE

These are just some examples of the things you may find yourself doing:

  • Visit different gardens to assess the mood of each garden. Take time to observe each garden and try to identify the different elements that contribute to the garden mood.
  • Observe how colour has been used in the three different gardens. Observe the colours of both plants and hard surfaces, and the way the colours have been combined.
  • Visit an historic garden in your area. Identify different features that make this an historic garden.
  • Visit a formal garden in your area. Identify features that make this a formal garden.
  • Visit an oriental garden either in person or by research.
  • Search for more information on gardens that reflect the styles.
  • Make notes of anything you find which is interesting and could be used in development of a Mediterranean style of garden in the locality in which you live.
  • Visit a coastal region near where you live and observe the type of plants that are growing near the seashore. Also observe the plants and design elements of nearby gardens. (If you are unable to visit a coastal region, use descriptions of coastal sites and gardens from books, magazines and the internet.)
  • Visit a modern courtyard garden (if there is no suitable garden in your area, use a garden described in a book, magazine or on the internet). Identify and describe the elements that make this a ‘modern’ garden. How has the designer overcome the restrictions of the site to create a feeling of spaciousness?
  • Search through telephone books, magazines and the internet to find suppliers of materials suitable for eclectic gardens such as pots, sundials, pebbles, statues, wrought iron, tiles, gazebos, seats, wind chimes, etc. Visit as many suppliers as possible and inspect these materials. Find out about their cost, availability and longevity.
  • Depending upon where you live, visit a dryland, permaculture, tropical, or rainforest garden in your area (if there is no suitable garden in your area, use a garden described in a book, magazine or on the internet). Identify and describe the elements that determine the style of this garden.

Extract of notes from the course:

There are many elements that contribute to the ambience or mood of a garden. Colour is perhaps most significant, however the choice of plants, the quantity of plants (or no plants), the permanent structures and ornamentation are also important.

Active vs. Passive

A garden with a barbecue area, a sandpit, a swing, a pool and a child’s play house would be seen as being ‘active’. It is clear that the garden is more utilitarian. Conversely, a garden with a bench beneath some shade trees, a pond, a sculpture, a herbaceous border and some specimen trees would create an ambience of tranquillity. It is more likely that the owners would spend time resting in the garden and admiring it. It would be considered ‘passive’.

Simple vs. Complex

A complex garden will clearly have lots of intricate areas created through using many different plant species. It may have a number of paths that lead to different areas of the garden. These areas may pertain to a number of different themes. There could be a number of different focal points. It could be planted so that different plants look their best at different times of the year, so as to maintain year round interest. Such a garden may have a number of effects on ambience. It may be quite stimulating for the onlooker encouraging them to look further and more deeply into the garden. It may activate their imagination and inspire them toward their own gardening aspirations. If the garden is extremely complex, however, it may also serve to overwhelm some individuals who would prefer something a little less complex so as to be able to relax.

On the other hand, a simple garden may have few plants, perhaps a large lawn area or paved area and little in the way of features. Such a garden would be more likely to evoke a feeling of relaxation and perhaps permit the onlooker to focus on their own thoughts. If the garden is too simple, however, it may make the onlooker feel disinterested or bored in the garden and it will therefore fail to attract people into it.

Light vs. Shade

The amount of light in the garden has quite a profound effect on mood. A garden that has much light could be associated with feelings of openness, joy, elation and optimism. A garden that has much shade would create feelings of enclosure, frustration, and gloom.

Movement vs. Static

Movement in the garden can be created in a number of ways. It can come about through the natural movement of trees and shrubs in the wind, through mobiles or through water fountains. It gives an air of vitality and of life. The associated sounds reiterate this sense of living; the rustle of the leaves in the trees, the splash of the water. On the contrary, a garden that has little movement may seem rather dull and lifeless.

Other Factors Affecting Mood

As well as the compositional elements, mood may be affected through the garden theme. A Japanese or Chinese garden may conjure up thoughts and feelings associated with the orient. A rigidly formal garden may evoke austerity, power and respect. A modern garden could trigger feelings of youth, vitality and chic.

The general state of the garden also plays an important role in the effect that it has on mood. For example, a well-maintained garden gives the impression of orderliness, attention and care. An overgrown garden with dilapidated structures, broken pots and pavers and so on, gives the feeling of neglect, decay and at worst, death (compare this too with the associations with history, battles and bygone times that are conjured up through the careful placing of cracked pillars, aged vases and other historical structures).

Humour can be injected into the garden using such tings as ornaments (anything from gnomes to manikins, toy cars to bizarre sculptures), planting up amusing containers such as a car tyre or old toilet, installing unusually twisted foliage or trees with funny shaped trunks, or perhaps even pruning a box tree into the shape of a helicopter or elephant.

Mystery can be achieved through concealed entrances, covered walkways, peepholes, murals separate ‘garden rooms’.

There are indeed numerous ways in which a myriad of moods can be instigated and the personality of the owner reflected in the garden. 
 

FREQUENT QUESTIONS

Why Choose This Course

  • Unique course materials (developed by our staff) and more current than some colleges (many reviewed annually); as a result, ACS graduates can be more up to date.
  • We work hard to help you understand and remember it, develop an ability to apply it in the real world, and build networks with others who work in this field (It’s more than just serving up a collection of information –if all you want is information, buy a book; but if you want an education, that takes learning to a whole new level).
  • Start whenever you want, study at your own pace, study anywhere
  • Don’t waste time and money traveling classes
  • We provide more choices–courses are written to allow you more options to focus on parts of the subject that are of more interest to you; a huge range of elective subjects are offered that don’t exist elsewhere.
  • Tutors are accessible (more than elsewhere) – academics work in both the UK and Australia, 5 days a week, 16 hours a day. Answering emails and phone calls from students are top priority.
  • We treat students as individuals –don’t get lost in a crowd. Our tutors communicate with you one to one.
  • Extra help at no extra cost if needed. When you find something you cannot do, we help you through it or will provide another option.
  • Support after you finish a course –We can advise about getting work, starting  business, writing a CV, etc. We can promote students and their businesses through our extensive profile on the internet. Graduates who ask will be helped.
  • Support from a team of a dozen professional horticulturists, living in different parts of the UK, and in both temperate and tropical climate zones of Australia.

About ACS

ACS was started in 1979 by John Mason, who at the time was a gardening author, horticultural consultant and lecturer in horticulture at several colleges across Melbourne (in Australia).  Over the summer that year John discovered that there were thousands of applicants going to be turned away from horticulture courses at Burnley Horticultural College (now Melbourne University). There were simply too few courses being offered for the number of people wanting to study horticulture in Australia. This situation prompted a move to establish a correspondence course at Burnley; but after months of unsuccessful lobbying for support from government; John wrote a course, and with help from a colleague at Council of Adult Education, marketed it.

Standards were originally set in line with what were seen to be the standards of Australia's top horticultural college; and over the years, those standards have never been reduced. This makes our courses longer and more demanding than some other colleges; but it has also led to us building a credibility that stands tall in the horticulture industry across the world. 

In the early 1990's John started visiting the UK and becoming involved with the horticulture industry there. Around the mid 1990's ACS began offering RHS courses, and in 2003, John was formally recognised for his contribution to British Horticulture by being made a fellow of the Institute of Horticulture. ACS, as a school, established an office and staff in the UK in 2001, and has expanded considerably since then. Today it is formally affiliated with five other colleges in the UK (including Warwickshire College); all of who license and deliver ACS courses. 

A team of leading horticulturists work for the school's horticulture department, including 12 faculty members in both the UK and Australia

 

How You Study

  • As soon as you enroll, we send an email to explain it all.
  • We direct you to a short orientation video (downloadable over the internet) to watch, where our principal introduces you to how the course works, and how you can access all sorts of support services
  • You are either given a code to access your course online, or sent out a CD or course materials through the mail (or by courier).
  • Work through lessons one by one, each lesson typically having four parts:
    • An aim -which tells you what you should be achieving in the lesson
    • Reading -notes written and regularly revised by our academic staff
    • Set Task(s) -These are practicals, research or other experiential learning tasks that strengthen and add to what you have been reading
    • Assignment -By answering questions, submitting them to a tutor, then getting feedback from the tutor, you confirm that you are on the right track, but more than that, you are guided to consider what you have been studying in different ways, broadening your perspective and reinforcing what you are learning about
    • Other - Your work in a course rarely stops at just the above four parts. Different courses and different students will need further learning experiences. Your set task or assignment may lead to other things, interacting with tutors or people in industry, reviewing additional reference materials or something else. We treat every student as an individual and supplement their learning needs as the occasion requires.
  • We provide access to and encourage you to use a range of supplementary services including an online student room, including online library; student bookshop, newsletters, social media etc.
  • We provide a "student manual", that is a quick solution to most problems that might occur

Recognition

  • ACS has a highly respected international profile: by employers and academics alike. People are more aware of us than many other distance education schools –just do a search for “horticulture distance education courses” and see what comes up on the internet; or search for ACS Distance education on Facebook or Linked in, and see how many connections we have compared to other colleges.
  • Recognised by International Accreditation and Recognition Council
  • ACS has been educating people around the world since 1979
  • Over 100,000 have now studied ACS courses, across more than 150 countries
  • Formal affiliations with colleges in five countries
  • A faculty of over 40 internationally renowned academics –books written by our staff used by universities and colleges around the world.

Extra Books or Reference Materials

  • The course provides you with everything that you need to complete it successfully.
  • Assignments may ask you to look for extra information (eg. by contacting nurseries, visiting gardens or searching the internet), but our school's resources and tutors are always available as a back up. If you hit a "roadblock", we can quickly send you additional information or provide expert advice over the phone or email; to keep you moving in your studies.
  • Some students choose to buy additional references, to take their learning beyond what is essential for the course. If a student wants to buy books, we operate an online bookshop offering ebooks written by staff at the school. Student discounts are available if you are studying with us. The range of e books available is being expanded rapidly, with at least one new ebook being written and published by our staff every month.
  • See www.acsebook.com  for ebooks (available in pounds stirling). We also sell books through our Australian bookshop (selling in Australian dollars) at www.acsbookshop.com